© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com,  All rights reserved.
Old Anima
continued . . .
BOOKS ON AGING
Elderhood, by Louise Aronson As revelatory as Atul Gawande's Being Mortal, physician and award-winning author Louise Aronson's Elderhood is an essential, empathetic look at a vital but often disparaged stage of life.
How to Do Nothing, by Jenny Odell This thrilling critique of the forces vying for our attention re- defines what we think of as productivity, shows us a new way to connect with our environment and reveals all that we’ve been too distracted to see about ourselves and our world.
Dementia Reimagined,  by Tia Powell The cultural and medical history of dementia and Alzheimer's disease by a leading psychiatrist and bioethicist who urges us to turn our focus from cure to care.
The Digital Doctor, by Robert Wachter While modern medicine produces miracles, it also delivers care that is too often unsafe, unreliable, unsatisfying, and impossibly expensive. For the past few decades, technology has been touted as the cure for all of healthcare's ills.
The Disease Delusion, by Jeffrey S. Bland For decades, Dr. Jeffrey Bland has been on the cutting edge of Functional Medicine, which seeks to pinpoint and prevent the cause of illness, rather than treat its symptoms. Managing chronic diseases accounts for three quarters of our total healthcare costs.
Deep Medicine, by Eric Topol How AI will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman, to disastrous effect. The doctor-patient relationship--the heart of medicine--is broken: doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound.
Blueprint,  by Robert Plomin One of the world's top behavioral geneticists argues that we need a radical rethink about what makes us who we are. The blueprint for our individuality lies in the 1% of DNA that differs between people.  
Wellbeing, by Mark Vernon Argues that positive psychology has overlooked and sidelined the ancient wisdom on wellbeing, notably from the Greek philosophers. Now is the time to pay it proper attention. Shows, surprisingly, that wellbeing is not found in a focus on pleasure, or even the pursuit of happiness itself.
12 Rules for Life,  by Jordan B. Peterson What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.
Unretirement,  by Chris Farrell The old idea of “retirement”- a word that means withdrawal, describing a time when people gave up productive employment and shrank their activities-was a short-lived historical anomaly. Humans have always found meaning and motivation in work and community.
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
Waking Up, by Sam Harris  For the millions of Americans who want spirituality without religion, this book is a guide to meditation as a rational spiritual practice informed by neuroscience and psychology.
Dancing with the Gods, by Kent Nerburn From struggles with money and the bitterness of rejection, to spiritual questions of inspiration and authenticity, offers insight, solace and courage to help young artists on the winding road to artistic fulfilment.
Sapiens,  by Yuval Noah Harari Spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Draws on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology and economics.
Philosophy for Life, by Jules Evans Evans explains how ancient philosophy saved his life, and how we can all use it to become happier, wiser and more resilient. Jules imagines a dream school, which includes 12 of the greatest and most colorful thinkers the world has ever known. Each of these ancient philosophers teaches a technique we can use to transform our selves.  
The Best Within Us, by Alan Waterman Assembles a panel of distinguished scholars whose work has been central to understanding positive aspects of psychological functioning. Together, the chapters explore the many ways in which the philosophic concept of eudaimonia is being employed in psychology.  
The 100-Year Life,  by Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott Many of us have been raised on the traditional notion of a three-stage approach to our working lives: education, followed by work and then retirement. But this well-established pathway is already beginning to collapse. Life expectancy is rising, final-salary pensions are vanishing, and increasing numbers of people are juggling multiple careers.
When Bad Things Happen to Good People, by Harold S. Kushner Kushner shares his wisdom as a rabbi, a parent, a reader, and a human being.  A classic that offers clear thinking and consolation in times of sorrow.
Factfulness, by Hans Rosling It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.
Braving the Wilderness, by Brene Brown Brown argues that we're experiencing a spiritual crisis of disconnection and introduces four practices of true belonging that challenge everything we believe about ourselves and each other. She writes, "True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary.”
Aging Thoughtfully,  by Martha C. Nussbaum Here are ideas about when to retire, how to refashion social security to help the elderly poor, how to learn from King Lear -- who did not retire successfully -- and whether to enjoy or criticize anti-aging cosmetic procedures. Some of the concerns are practical: philanthropic decisions, relations with one's children and grandchildren, the purchase of annuities, and how to provide for care in old age.
The River of Consciousness, by Oliver Sacks One of two books Sacks was working on up to his death, and it reveals his ability to make unexpected connections, his sheer joy in knowledge, and his unceasing, timeless project to understand what makes us human.
Big Magic,  by Elizabeth Gilbert Discusses the attitudes, approaches, and habits we need in order to live our most creative lives. Balancing between soulful spirituality and cheerful pragmatism, Gilbert encourages us to uncover the “strange jewels” that are hidden within each of us.
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Old Anima
© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com. All rights reserved.
CONTINUED
BOOKS ON AGING
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
Elderhood, by Louise Aronson As revelatory as Atul Gawande's Being Mortal, physician and award-winning author Louise Aronson's Elderhood is an essential, empathetic look at a vital but often disparaged stage of life.
How to Do Nothing, by Jenny Odell This thrilling critique of the forces vying for our attention re-defines what we think of as productivity, shows us a new way to connect with our environment and reveals all that we’ve been too distracted to see about ourselves and our world.
Dementia Reimagined,  by Tia Powell The cultural and medical history of dementia and Alzheimer's disease by a leading psychiatrist and bioethicist who urges us to turn our focus from cure to care.
The Digital Doctor, by Robert Wachter While modern medicine produces miracles, it also delivers care that is too often unsafe, unreliable, unsatisfying, and impossibly expensive. For the past few decades, technology has been touted as the cure for all of healthcare's ills.
The Disease Delusion, by Jeffrey S. Bland For decades, Dr. Jeffrey Bland has been on the cutting edge of Functional Medicine, which seeks to pinpoint and prevent the cause of illness, rather than treat its symptoms. Managing chronic diseases accounts for three quarters of our total healthcare costs.
Deep Medicine, by Eric Topol How AI will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman, to disastrous effect. The doctor-patient relationship--the heart of medicine--is broken: doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound.
Blueprint,  by Robert Plomin One of the world's top behavioral geneticists argues that we need a radical rethink about what makes us who we are. The blueprint for our individuality lies in the 1% of DNA that differs between people.  
Wellbeing, by Mark Vernon Argues that positive psychology has overlooked and sidelined the ancient wisdom on wellbeing, notably from the Greek philosophers. Now is the time to pay it proper attention.
12 Rules for Life,  by Jordan B. Peterson What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.
Unretirement,  by Chris Farrell The old idea of “retirement”- a word that means withdrawal, describing a time when people gave up productive employment and shrank their activities-was a short-lived historical anomaly. Humans have always found meaning and motivation in work and community.
Waking Up, by Sam Harris  For the millions of Americans who want spirituality without religion, this book is a guide to meditation as a rational spiritual practice informed by neuroscience and psychology.
Dancing with the Gods, by Kent Nerburn From struggles with money and the bitterness of rejection, to spiritual questions of inspiration and authenticity, offers insight, solace and courage to help young artists on the winding road to artistic fulfilment.
Sapiens,  by Yuval Noah Harari Spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Draws on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology and economics.
Philosophy for Life, by Jules Evans Explains how ancient philosophy saved his life, and how we can all use it to become happier, wiser and more resilient. Jules imagines a dream school, which includes 12 of the greatest and most colorful thinkers the world has ever known. Each of these ancient philosophers teaches a technique we can use to transform our selves.  
The Best Within Us, by Alan Waterman Assembles a panel of distinguished scholars whose work has been central to understanding positive aspects of psychological functioning. Together, the chapters explore the many ways in which the philosophic concept of eudaimonia is being employed in psychology.  
The 100-Year Life,  by Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott Many of us have been raised on the traditional notion of a three-stage approach to our working lives: education, followed by work and then retirement. But this well- established pathway is already beginning to collapse.
When Bad Things Happen to Good People, by Harold S. Kushner Kushner shares his wisdom as a rabbi, a parent, a reader, and a human being.  A classic that offers clear thinking and consolation in times of sorrow.
Factfulness, by Hans Rosling It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.
Braving the Wilderness, by Brene Brown Brown argues that we're experiencing a spiritual crisis of disconnection and introduces four practices of true belonging that challenge everything we believe about ourselves and each other. She writes, "True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary.”
Aging Thoughtfully, by Martha C. Nussbaum Here are ideas about when to retire, how to refashion social security to help the elderly poor, how to learn from King Lear -- who did not retire successfully -- and whether to enjoy or criticize anti-aging cosmetic procedures. Some of the concerns are practical: philanthropic decisions, relations with one's children and grandchildren, the purchase of annuities, and how to provide for care in old age.
The River of Consciousness, by Oliver Sacks One of two books Sacks was working on up to his death, and it reveals his ability to make unexpected connections, his sheer joy in knowledge, and his unceasing, timeless project to understand what makes us human.
Big Magic,  by Elizabeth Gilbert Discusses the attitudes, approaches, and habits we need in order to live our most creative lives. Balancing between soulful spirituality and cheerful pragmatism, Gilbert encourages us to uncover the “strange jewels” that are hidden within each of us.