© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com,  All rights reserved.
Old Anima
continued . . .
BOOKS ON AGING
Mindset by Carol S. Dweck Shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities.
A Signficant Life, by Todd May Offers an exhilarating new way of thinking about life, one deeply attuned to how it actually is: a work in progress, a journey—and often a narrative.
Heavens on Earth,  by Michael Shermer Focuses on recent scientific attempts to achieve immortality by radical life extentionists, extropians, transhumanists, cryonicists, and mind uploaders, along with utopians who have attempted to create heaven on earth.
Born on Third Base, by Chuck Collins It is time to think differently, says longtime inequality expert and activist Chuck Collins. Born into the one percent, Collins gave away his inheritance at 26 and spent the next three decades mobilizing against inequality. He uses his perspective from both sides of the divide to deliver a new narrative.
The Art of Memoir, by Mary Karr Synthesizes her expertise as professor and therapy patient, writer and spiritual seeker, recovered alcoholic and “black belt sinner,” providing a unique window into the mechanics and art of the form that is as irreverent, insightful, and entertaining as her own work in the genre.
Insight, by Tasha Eurich Regardless of our line of work or stage of life, success depends on understanding who we are and how we come across. Research shows that self-awareness means better work performance, smarter life choices, deeper, more meaningful relationships, and a more fulfilling career.
The Happiness of Pursuit, by Chris Guillebeau When he set out to visit all of the planet’s countries by age thirty-five, compulsive goal seeker Chris Guillebeau never imagined that his journey’s biggest revelation would be how many people like himself exist – each pursuing a challenging quest.  
The Death of Expertise, by Tom Nichols Experts are not always right. The crucial point is that bad decisions by experts can and have been effectively challenged by other well-informed experts. The issue now is that the democratization of information dissemination has created an army of ill-informed citizens who denounce expertise.
The Spirituality of Age, by Robert L. Weber and Carol Orsborn Addressing head-on how to make the transition from fears about aging into a fuller, richer appreciation of the next phase of our lives, the authors guide you through 25 key questions that can help you embrace the shadow side of aging as well as the spiritual opportunities inherent in growing older.
Hillbilly Elegy, by J.D. Vance From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class -  a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis. 
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
The Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert Over the last half- billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.
The Courage to Be by Paul Tillich Originally published more than fifty years ago, The Courage to Be has become a classic of twentieth- century religious and philosophical thought. The great Christian existentialist thinker Paul Tillich describes the dilemma of modern man and points a way to the conquest of the problem of anxiety. 
The Retiring Mind, by  Robert P. Delamontagne After settling into retirement, have you found yourself asking, Is that all there is? Even though retirement is one of life's most psychologically stressful milestones, retirement advice usually focuses on finances, rather than feelings.
Deep Work,  by Cal Newport Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time.  
Our Accelerating Future, by Michael Anissimov In this collection of short articles, Singularity Summit co-founder and former Singularity Institute futurist Michael Anissimov describes the most important ideas in futurism and transhumanism: the Singularity, Artificial Intelligence, nanotechnology, and cybernetic enhancement.  
Something More,  by Sarah Ban Breathnach Explores the curious circumstance that many women find themselves experiencing today: They feel that they really ought to be happy, given all the wonderful things in their lives, but live with the sadness that there's still something missing.
Succeed, by Heidi Grant Halvorson Offers insights-many surprising-that readers can use immediately, including how to: Set a goal so that you will persist even in the face of adversity. Build willpower, which can be strengthened like a muscle. And, avoid the kind of positive thinking that makes people fail.
Me, Myself and Us by Brian R. Little In the past few decades, personality psychology has made considerable progress in raising new questions about human nature—and providing some provocative answers. New scientific research has transformed old ideas about personality based on the theories of Freud, Jung, and the humanistic psychologies of the sixties.
The Gifts of Imperfection, by Brene Brown Offers a powerful and inspiring book that explores how to cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection to embrace your imperfections and to recognize that you are enough.
The Organized Mind,  by Daniel J. Levitin The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more—and faster—decisions about our lives than ever before.
Curious, by Ian Leslie Makes a passionate case for the cultivation of our desire to know. Curious people tend to be smarter, more creative and more successful. But at the very moment when the rewards of curiosity have never been higher, it is misunderstood and undervalued, and increasingly practised only by a cognitive elite.
The Impulse Society, by Paul Roberts We must confront an unhappy truth: a high-tech, high- speed, consumer economy engineered to provide maximum power to individuals is destroying our capacity to move forward as a society.
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Old Anima
© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com. All rights reserved.
CONTINUED
BOOKS ON AGING
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
Mindset by Carol S. Dweck Shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities.
A Signficant Life, by Todd May Offers an exhilarating new way of thinking about life, one deeply attuned to how it actually is: a work in progress, a journey—and often a narrative.
Heavens on Earth,  by Michael Shermer Focuses on recent scientific attempts to achieve immortality by radical life extentionists, extropians, transhumanists, cryonicists, and mind uploaders, along with utopians who have attempted to create heaven on earth.
Born on Third Base, by Chuck Collins It is time to think differently, says longtime inequality expert and activist Chuck Collins. Born into the one percent, Collins gave away his inheritance at 26 and spent the next three decades mobilizing against inequality. He uses his perspective from both sides of the divide to deliver a new narrative.
The Art of Memoir, by Mary Karr Synthesizes her expertise as professor and therapy patient, writer and spiritual seeker, recovered alcoholic and “black belt sinner,” providing a unique window into the mechanics and art of the form that is as irreverent, insightful, and entertaining as her own work in the genre.
Insight, by Tasha Eurich Regardless of our line of work or stage of life, success depends on understanding who we are and how we come across. Research shows that self-awareness means better work performance, smarter life choices, deeper, more meaningful relationships, and a more fulfilling career.
The Death of Expertise, by Tom Nichols Experts are not always right. The crucial point is that bad decisions by experts can and have been effectively challenged by other well- informed experts. The issue now is that the democratization of information dissemination has created an army of ill- informed citizens who denounce expertise.
The Happiness of Pursuit, by Chris Guillebeau When he set out to visit all of the planet’s countries by age thirty- five, compulsive goal seeker Chris Guillebeau never imagined that his journey’s biggest revelation would be how many people like himself exist – each pursuing a challenging quest.  
The Spirituality of Age, by Robert L. Weber and Carol Orsborn Addressing head-on how to make the transition from fears about aging into a fuller, richer appreciation of the next phase of our lives, the authors guide you through 25 key questions that can help you embrace the shadow side of aging as well as the spiritual opportunities inherent in growing older.
Hillbilly Elegy, by J.D. Vance From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class -  a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis. 
The Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert Over the last half-billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.
The Courage to Be by Paul Tillich Originally published more than fifty years ago, The Courage to Be has become a classic of twentieth-century religious and philosophical thought. The great Christian existentialist thinker Paul Tillich describes the dilemma of modern man and points a way to the conquest of the problem of anxiety. 
The Retiring Mind, by  Robert P. Delamontagne After settling into retirement, have you found yourself asking, Is that all there is? Even though retirement is one of life's most psychologically stressful milestones, retirement advice usually focuses on finances, rather than feelings.
Deep Work,  by Cal Newport Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time.  
Our Accelerating Future, by Michael Anissimov In this collection of short articles, Singularity Summit co-founder and former Singularity Institute futurist Michael Anissimov describes the most important ideas in futurism and transhumanism: the Singularity, Artificial Intelligence, nanotechnology, and cybernetic enhancement.  
Something More,  by Sarah Ban Breathnach Explores the curious circumstance that many women find themselves experiencing today: They feel that they really ought to be happy, given all the wonderful things in their lives, but live with the sadness that there's still something missing.
Succeed, by Heidi Grant Halvorson Offers insights- many surprising-that readers can use immediately, including how to: Set a goal so that you will persist even in the face of adversity. Build willpower, which can be strengthened like a muscle. And, avoid the kind of positive thinking that makes people fail.
Me, Myself and Us by Brian R. Little In the past few decades, personality psychology has made considerable progress in raising new questions about human nature—and providing some provocative answers. New scientific research has transformed old ideas about personality based on the theories of Freud, Jung, and the humanistic psychologies of the sixties.
The Organized Mind,  by Daniel J. Levitin The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more—and faster—decisions about our lives than ever before.
The Gifts of Imperfection, by Brene Brown Offers a powerful and inspiring book that explores how to cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection to embrace your imperfections and to recognize that you are enough.
Curious, by Ian Leslie Makes a passionate case for the cultivation of our desire to know. Curious people tend to be smarter, more creative and more successful. But at the very moment when the rewards of curiosity have never been higher, it is misunderstood and undervalued, and increasingly practised only by a cognitive elite.
The Impulse Society, by Paul Roberts We must confront an unhappy truth: a high- tech, high-speed, consumer economy engineered to provide maximum power to individuals is destroying our capacity to move forward as a society.