© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com,  All rights reserved.
Old Anima
Welcome to Old Anima’s Books on Aging section, currently under development. The books listed here, thus far, are a small sample of the numerous books both directly and indirectly related to growing old that George has read, with many more to be posted here in the not-too-distant future. The brief abstracts are snippets mostly taken from larger abstracts listed on Goodreads, the excellent book site we link to for each book (with a few exceptions).
BOOKS ON AGING
Ageless Soul,  by Thomas Moore Using examples from his practice as a psychotherapist and teacher who lectures widely on the soul of medicine and spirituality, Moore argues for a new vision of aging: as a dramatic series of initiations, rather than a diminishing experience, one that each of us has the tools―experience, maturity, fulfillment―to live out.
Aging Existentially,  by Charles Hayes “People react to the inevitability of oblivion in myriad ways,” writes Hays. “The most common reaction seems to be denial and escape, but lately I find that more and more people are beginning to appreciate the importance of confronting mortality for its value in enhancing the present.”
Aging with Wisdom, by Olivia Ames Hoblitzelle  From the intro: “MUCH OF LIFE comes down to a matter of perspective. Given this truth, how do perspectives change for elders and how do we handle the process of our aging? Each of us will have our own answers, but speaking generally, the elder years ask for another kind of growth, different from our earlier years. They invite continuing discovery, deepening the inner life, and opening to the mystery in which we live.”
Boomer Reinvention, by John Tarnoff Tarnoff lays out a proven methodology of 5 key steps and 23 actionable strategies to give boomers the resources and confidence they need to pivot to a sustainable second act, encore career – one that can be not only financially successful, but personally fulfilling as well.
Brain Rules for Aging Well, by John Medina How come I can never find my keys? Why don't I sleep as well as I used to? Why do my friends keep repeating the same stories? What can I do to keep my brain sharp? Scientists know. Developmental molecular biologist Dr. John Medina, gives you the facts—and the prescription to age well.
Care of the Soul, by Thomas Moore Moore draws on his own life as a therapist practicing “care of the soul,” as well as his studies of the world’s religions and his work in music and art, to create this inspirational guide that examines the connections between spirituality and the problems of individuals and society.
Contemplative Aging,  by Edmund Sherman A unique guidebook for people at least sixty years of age on how to experience a more peaceful, aware way of being through contemplative practices and to transcend the many causes of suffering inherent in later life In modern societies people are expected to remain "activity-oriented" in their later years, rather than change to a more contemplative, spiritual, and peaceful way of living.
Die Empty,  by Todd Henry Henry explains the forces that keep people in stagnation and introduces a three-part process for tapping into your passion: Excavate: Find the bedrock of your work to discover what drives you. Cultivate: Learn how to develop the curiosity, humility, and persistence that save you from getting stuck in ruts. Resonate: Learn how your unique brilliance can inspire others.
Diversity Explosion,  by William H. Frey The concept of a "minority white" may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time.
Emotional Agility,  by Susan David Drawing on her extensive professional research, her international consulting work, and her own experiences growing up in Apartheid-era South Africa and losing her father at a young age, David shows how anyone can become more emotionally agile and thrive in an uncertain world.
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life, by James Hollis Jungian psycho- analyst James Hollis believes it is only in the second half of life that we can truly come to know who we are and thus create a life that has meaning. Hollis explores the ways we can grow and evolve to fully become ourselves when the traditional roles of adulthood aren't quite working for us, revealing a new way of uncovering and embracing our authentic selves.
Fingerprints of God,  by Barbara Bradley Hagerty Hagerty interviews some of the world's top scientists to describe what their groundbreaking research reveals about our human spiritual experience. From analyses of the brain functions of Buddhist monks and Carmelite nuns, to the possibilities of healing the sick through directed prayer, to what near-death experiences illuminate about the afterlife.
Gratitude, by Oliver Sacks In January 2015, Oliver Sacks was diagnosed with a recurrence of cancer, and he shared this news in a New York Times essay that inspired readers all over the world: "I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude...”
How Do We Choose to Be,  by Margaret J. Wheatley This book is born of Wheatley’s desire to summon us to be leaders for this time as things fall apart, to reclaim leadership as a noble profession that creates possibility and humaneness in the midst of increasing fear and turmoil.
How to Be Alone,  by Sarah Maitland Our fast-paced society does not approve of solitude; being alone is antisocial and some even find it sinister. Why is this so when autonomy, personal freedom, and individualism are more highly prized than ever before? Maitland answers this question by exploring changing attitudes throughout history. 
How Will You Measure Your Life, by Clayton M. Christensen Christensen puts forth a series of questions: How can I be sure that I'll find satisfaction in my career? How can I be sure that my personal relationships become enduring sources of happiness? How can I avoid compromising my integrity—and stay out of jail? Using lessons from some of the world's greatest businesses, he provides incredible insights into these challenging questions.
Let Your Life Speak,  by Parker J. Palmer With wisdom, compassion, and gentle humor, Parker J. Palmer invites us to listen to the inner teacher and follow its leadings toward a sense of meaning and purpose. Telling stories from his own life and the lives of others who have made a difference, he shares insights gained from darkness and depression as well as fulfillment and joy.
Letters to My Son, by Kent Nurburn In an attempt to gather what wisdom he could to guide his son into adulthood, Kent Nerburn published a powerful collection of essays that touched the hearts of parents and children everywhere. In this beautiful revised edition, Nerburn refines his advice and expands his thoughts.
Life Reimagined,  by Barbara Bradley Hagerty Hagerty explains that midlife is about renewal: It’s the time to renegotiate your purpose, refocus your relationships, and transform the way you think about the world and yourself. She draws from emerging information in neurology, psychology, biology, genetics, and sociology—as well as her own story of midlife transformation.
Love’s Executioner,  by Irvin D. Yalom The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story.
Nasty, Brutish & Long,  by Ira Rosofsky A coming of old-age story. In nursing homes across the country, members of the Greatest Generation are living out their last days. No matter how exciting or mundane their lives, they’re now occupying a hospital-style room, a public space where you can’t lock your door and strangers come and go.
Old Age: A Beginners Guide, by Michael Kinsley In this series of essays, Michael Kinsley uses his own battle with Parkinson’s disease to unearth answers to questions we are all at some time forced to confront. “Sometimes,” he writes, “I feel like a scout from my generation, sent out ahead to experience in my fifties what even the healthiest Boomers are going to experience in their sixties, seventies, or eighties.”
Old Anima
© Copyright 2019. UnderstandingXYZ.com. All rights reserved.
Welcome to Old Anima’s Books on Aging section, currently under development. The books listed here, thus far, are a small sample of the numerous books both directly and indirectly related to growing old that George has read, with many more to be posted here in the not-too-distant future. The brief abstracts are snippets mostly taken from larger abstracts listed on Goodreads, the excellent book site we link to for each book (with a few exceptions).
BOOKS ON AGING
“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”     -Rene Descartes
Ageless Soul,  by Thomas Moore Using examples from his practice as a psychotherapist and teacher who lectures widely on the soul of medicine and spirituality, Moore argues for a new vision of aging: as a dramatic series of initiations, rather than a diminishing experience, one that each of us has the tools―experience, maturity, fulfillment―to live out.
Aging Existentially,  by Charles Hayes “People react to the inevitability of oblivion in myriad ways,” writes Hays. “The most common reaction seems to be denial and escape, but lately I find that more and more people are beginning to appreciate the importance of confronting mortality for its value in enhancing the present.”
Aging with Wisdom, by Olivia Ames Hoblitzelle From the intro: “MUCH OF LIFE comes down to a matter of perspective. Given this truth, how do perspectives change for elders and how do we handle the process of our aging? Each of us will have our own answers, but speaking generally, the elder years ask for another kind of growth, different from our earlier years. They invite continuing discovery, deepening the inner life, and opening to the mystery in which we live.”
Boomer Reinvention, by John Tarnoff Tarnoff lays out a proven methodology of 5 key steps and 23 actionable strategies to give boomers the resources and confidence they need to pivot to a sustainable second act, encore career – one that can be not only financially successful, but personally fulfilling as well.
Brain Rules for Aging Well, by John Medina How come I can never find my keys? Why don't I sleep as well as I used to? Why do my friends keep repeating the same stories? What can I do to keep my brain sharp? Scientists know. Developmental molecular biologist Dr. John Medina, gives you the facts—and the prescription to age well.
Care of the Soul, by Thomas Moore Moore draws on his own life as a therapist practicing “care of the soul,” as well as his studies of the world’s religions and his work in music and art, to create this inspirational guide that examines the connections between spirituality and the problems of individuals and society.
Contemplative Aging,  by Edmund Sherman A unique guidebook for people at least sixty years of age on how to experience a more peaceful, aware way of being through contemplative practices and to transcend the many causes of suffering inherent in later life In modern societies people are expected to remain "activity-oriented" in their later years, rather than change to a more contemplative, spiritual, and peaceful way of living.
Die Empty,  by Todd Henry Henry explains the forces that keep people in stagnation and introduces a three-part process for tapping into your passion: Excavate: Find the bedrock of your work to discover what drives you. Cultivate: Learn how to develop the curiosity, humility, and persistence that save you from getting stuck in ruts. Resonate: Learn how your unique brilliance can inspire others.
Diversity Explosion, by William H. Frey The concept of a "minority white" may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time.
Emotional Agility,  by Susan David Drawing on her extensive professional research, her international consulting work, and her own experiences growing up in Apartheid- era South Africa and losing her father at a young age, David shows how anyone can become more emotionally agile and thrive in an uncertain world.
Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life, by James Hollis Jungian psycho- analyst James Hollis believes it is only in the second half of life that we can truly come to know who we are and thus create a life that has meaning. Hollis explores the ways we can grow and evolve to fully become ourselves when the traditional roles of adulthood aren't quite working for us, revealing a new way of uncovering and embracing our authentic selves.
Fingerprints of God,  by Barbara Bradley Hagerty Hagerty interviews some of the world's top scientists to describe what their groundbreaking research reveals about our human spiritual experience. From analyses of the brain functions of Buddhist monks and Carmelite nuns, to the possibilities of healing the sick through directed prayer, to what near- death experiences illuminate about the afterlife.
How Do We Choose to Be,  by Margaret J. Wheatley This book is born of Wheatley’s desire to summon us to be leaders for this time as things fall apart, to reclaim leadership as a noble profession that creates possibility and humaneness in the midst of increasing fear and turmoil.
Gratitude, by Oliver Sacks In January 2015, Oliver Sacks was diagnosed with a recurrence of cancer, and he shared this news in a New York Times essay that inspired readers all over the world: "I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude...”
How to Be Alone,  by Sarah Maitland Our fast- paced society does not approve of solitude; being alone is antisocial and some even find it sinister. Why is this so when autonomy, personal freedom, and individualism are more highly prized than ever before? Maitland answers this question by exploring changing attitudes throughout history. 
How Will You Measure Your Life, by Clayton M. Christensen Christensen puts forth a series of questions: How can I be sure that I'll find satisfaction in my career? How can I be sure that my personal relationships become enduring sources of happiness? How can I avoid compromising my integrity—and stay out of jail? Using lessons from some of the world's greatest businesses, he provides incredible insights into these challenging questions.
Let Your Life Speak,  by Parker J. Palmer With wisdom, compassion, and gentle humor, Parker J. Palmer invites us to listen to the inner teacher and follow its leadings toward a sense of meaning and purpose. Telling stories from his own life and the lives of others who have made a difference, he shares insights gained from darkness and depression as well as fulfillment and joy.
Letters to My Son, by Kent Nurburn In an attempt to gather what wisdom he could to guide his son into adulthood, Kent Nerburn published a powerful collection of essays that touched the hearts of parents and children everywhere. In this beautiful revised edition, Nerburn refines his advice and expands his thoughts.
Life Reimagined,  by Barbara Bradley Hagerty Hagerty explains that midlife is about renewal: It’s the time to renegotiate your purpose, refocus your relationships, and transform the way you think about the world and yourself. She draws from emerging information in neurology, psychology, biology, genetics, and sociology—as well as her own story of midlife transformation.
Love’s Executioner,  by Irvin D. Yalom The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story.
Nasty, Brutish & Long,  by Ira Rosofsky A coming of old-age story. In nursing homes across the country, members of the Greatest Generation are living out their last days. No matter how exciting or mundane their lives, they’re now occupying a hospital- style room, a public space where you can’t lock your door and strangers come and go.
Old Age: A Beginners Guide, by Michael Kinsley In this series of essays, Michael Kinsley uses his own battle with Parkinson’s disease to unearth answers to questions we are all at some time forced to confront. “Sometimes,” he writes, “I feel like a scout from my generation, sent out ahead to experience in my fifties what even the healthiest Boomers are going to experience in their sixties, seventies, or eighties.”